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Our aim is to develop healthy posture and gait in children. We diagnose and treat all problems of the feet in children aged 0 to 18 years.

Children’s feet are very important and are often are not even checked.

It has been my experience that proper care and treatment of the feet, beginning in childhood, will prevent many of the mechanical and orthopaedic problems seen in adults. Preventative care in the field of Podiatry is just an important to your child as it is in dentistry or general medicine. Many children walk excessively pigeon toed, flat-footed, or are bow legged.

The younger the child, the easier and shorter the treatment in general. If you think that something is wrong with your child’s feet, then it is likely that there is something wrong.

Don’t wait for your child to grow out of foot problems, because many do not. If your child is going to grow out of their foot problems, you should notice steady and gradual improvement from week to week. Critical aspects of postural development occur from birth to eight years when the adult gait patterns are formed. Growing pains can be an indication that there is something wrong.

Your Baby’s Feet

The human foot is one of the most complicated parts of the body. It has 26 bones, and in laced with ligaments, muscles, blood vessels, and nerves. Because the feet of young children are soft and pliable, abnormal pressure can easily cause deformities.

 

 

  • Look carefully at your baby’s feet. If you notice something that does not look normal to you, seek professional advice immediately.
  • Cover baby’s feet loosely. Tight covers restrict movement and can retard development.
  • Provide an opportunity for exercising the feet. Lying uncovered enables the baby to kick and perform other related motions which prepare the feet for weight-bearing.
  • Change the baby’s position several times a day. Lying too long in one spot, especially on the stomach, can put excessive strain on the feet and legs.
Starting to Walk

It is unwise to force a child to walk. When physically and emotionally ready, the child will walk. Comparisons with other children are misleading, since the age for independent walking ranges from 10 to 18 months.

When the child first begins to walk, shoes are not necessary indoors. Allowing the child to go barefoot or to wear just socks helps the foot to grow normally and to develop its musculature and strength, as well as the grasping action of toes. Of course, when walking outside or on rough surfaces, babies’ feet should be protected in lightweight, flexible footwear made of natural materials As a child’s feet continue to develop, it may be necessary to change shoe and sock size every few months to allow room for the feet to grow.

Although foot problems result mainly from injury, deformity, illness, or hereditary factors, improper footwear can aggravate pre-existing conditions. Shoes or other footwear should never be handed down. The feet of young children are often unstable because of muscle problems which make walking difficult or uncomfortable. A thorough examination by The Podiatrist at Kids ‘n Motion may detect an underlying defect or condition which may require immediate treatment or consultation with another specialist.

Children's Feet

You worry about your children’s teeth, eyes and other parts of the body. You teach washing, brushing, and grooming, but what do you do about your child’s feet, especially those still developing.

Many adult foot problems have their origins in childhood and are present at birth. Professional attention and regular foot care can minimize these problems in later life.

Neglecting foot health invites problems in other parts of the body, such as the legs and back. There can also be undesirable personality effects. The youngster with troublesome feet walks awkwardly and usually has poor general posture. As a result, the growing child may become shy, introverted, and avoid physical activities and social functions. Consultation between The Podiatrist at Kids ‘n Motion and other health professionals can help to resolve these problems.

Some children have poor balance and are clumsy. This is because the nerve messages from their feet are not being transmitted to the head efficiently. This can be treated by the Kids ‘n Motion Podiatrists. Children who have poor balance look down, put their arms out and take very small steps when performing very simple balance related activities.

Some children will be required to do exercises to improve their posture, balance and foot function. At Kids ‘n Motion Podiatrists we customise an exercise program for each child. Digital photos of your child doing their exercises will be provided. This service is a helpful reminder for you at home when performing exercises.

Things you need to know
  • The younger the child the easier and shorter the treatment in general.
  • If you think something is wrong with your child’s feet, then it is likely that there is something wrong.
  • Don’t wait for your child to grow out of foot problems, because many do not.
  • If your child is going to grow out of their foot problems, you should notice steady and gradual improvement from week to week.
  • Critical aspects of postural development occur from birth to eight years when the adult gait patterns are formed.
  • Growing pains can be an indication that there is something wrong.
You should contact us when
  • You first notice a problem with your child’s feet.
  • A relative or friend makes comment about your child’s feet.
  • Your child complains of tired or sore feet or legs.
  • Your child is not walking by the age of 18 months.
  • Your child wants to be carried most of the time.
What we treat
  • Gait (walking) related disorders.
    • In-toeing
    • Out-toeing
    • Tip- toe walking
    • Delayed walking
    • Flat feet
    • Limb length differences
    • Low muscle tone
    • Balance problems and clumsiness
    • Sports injuries
  • Ingrown toenails.
  • Hammer toes.
  • Bunions.
  • Twisted toes.
  • Skin conditions
    • warts
    • corns
    • calluses

Get in touch today!

Call: 09 550 6324
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